OPG (orthopantomography)

What is an OPG?

An OPG is a 2D X-ray that is taken to demonstrate all your teeth and its supporting bone as well as your sinuses and temporo-mandibular joints. The X-Ray is taken with the patient in a standing position, biting down on a plastic bite piece. The scanner then makes a revolution around the patient's head, obtaining the scan within 15 seconds. The patient is allowed to breathe during this period, but asked to keep as still as they can.

Preparation

Before an examination, the patient will be asked to remove any metallic jewellery from around the head and neck area, including partial metallic dentures. In the event  that the patient has a metallic fixture which cannot be removed, such as certain stud earrings, the patient will still be able to go through the examination. No appointments required.

 

Lat Ceph (Lateral Cephalometry)

 
The What is a Lateral Cephalometry?
 
A Lat Ceph, or PA Ceph, is an x-ray of your head that demonstrates your facial profile. It is commonly requested for a patient who is undergoing, or thinking of undergoing orthodontic treatment. This X-ray is taken with the patient in a seated or upright position.  
 
Preparation
 
Before an examination, the patient will be asked to remove any metallic jewellery from around the head and neck area, including partial metallic dentures. In the event  that the patient has a metallic fixture which cannot be removed, such as certain stud earrings, the patient will still be able to go through the examination. The patient will also be asked to put their back teeth together, in their natural bite. No appointments required.
 
 

Intra-oral X-Rays 

 
What are intra-oral X-Rays?
 
Intra-oral X-rays are 2D examinations that demonstrate individual groups of teeth and their surrounding structure in very high detail. They are called intra-oral because the small imaging plate receptor is placed within the patient's mouth during the examination. These examinations can take between 10 to 25 mins depending on the number of teeth that are being examined. Some referrers request these imaging to complement the OPG and gain a better overview of the state of a patient's dentition.  
 
Preparation
 
Before an examination, the patient will be asked to remove any metallic jewellery from around the head and neck area, including partial metallic dentures. In the event  that the patient has a metallic fixture which cannot be removed, such as certain stud earrings, the patient will still be able to go through the examination. Appointments are recommended.
 
 
 

Cone Beam CT (CBCT)

What is a Cone Beam CT Scan?

A Cone Beam CT is a scan that is used to demonstrate structures (teeth, supporting bone, TMJ, sinuses) within the mouth and face in 3D. This examinations is requested in cases where 2D imaging such as OPG, Lat Ceph and Intra-oral examinations, do not provide conclusive evidence for the problems that the referring clinician is looking for. The benefits of the CBCT scan as a diagnostic tool are numerous when utilised in the right cases and it's importance in discovering dental problems have been thorougly highlighted in numerous research papers. The radiation dose from this examination varies, but is considered relatively low, when compared to Medical CT machines.  

Preparation

Before an examination, the patient will be asked to remove any metallic jewellery from around the head and neck area, including partial metallic dentures. In the event  that the patient has a metallic fixture which cannot be removed, such as certain stud earrings, the patient will still be able to go through the examination. The scans last between 10-25 seconds with the patient in a seated position. Patient's are instructed to breath slow and gently and now swallow during the scan. Appointments are required.

 

Want to learn more about Radiation dose?

A table of effective radiation dose from CBCT machines

Radiation while flying?

Background Radiation?

If you are concerned about the risks involved with medical radiation please ask before the examination and the Radiographer will kindly explain to you the associated risks. Clayray recognizes the risks involved in exposing a patient to radiation, which is why we are committed to the principle of ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achieveable) when conducting our radiologic examinations.